Monthly Archives: May 2011

Over the next few weeks, the Connected Business will run a series of interviews with organisations that are using “big data”, developing technologies to manage it, and providing the know-how to unlock its potential.
This week’s show features interviews with data experts and we hear how Oxford University used student data to rebuff recent charges of elitism.

 

In this week’s podcast: The sounds of science – we talk to composer Bill Dougherty about a piece of music composed for the Sound of Science day at the Science Museum called ‘In Time’; plus we hear from Nadia Ramlagan from AAAS about how the sense of smell may have stimulated brain evolution in our mammalian ancestors 200 million years ago.

Presented by Clive Cookson with Diana Garnham

Produced by LJ Filotrani

 

Lagarde is right to play the female card – this is the best time there has been to be a woman with talent, charm, and an appetite for advancement, says Lucy Kellaway

 

In this week’s podcast: the essential relationship between the US and the UK; Spain on the edge of a sovereign debt crisis; stalemate in Libya – what next for the Arab spring; and, we look to the future for Japan’s energy policy post Fukushima.

Presented by Shawn Donnan with Sarah Neville, David Gardner and Abeer Allah in the studio in London, Peter Spiegel in Brussels, Victor Mallet in Madrid and Mure Dickie in Hong Kong.

Produced by LJ Filotrani

 

A pension offer you can refuse; why two-year fixed mortgages are a waste of time; and an end to cash – will phones be all you need in your pocket?

Presented by Matthew Vincent, with guest Ray Boulger of John Charcol.

 

In this week’s podcast: Crude oil predicted to hit $130; UK green investment bank to open early next year; US energy policy; plus, comments from Energy Source.

Presented by Sylvia Pfeifer with David Blair, Javier Blas and Kiran Stacey in the studio and Karen Harbert, CEO of the US Chamber’s Institute for 21st Century Energy, in Washington.

Produced by LJ Filotrani

 

Established in 1895, the Venice Biennale has been called anachronistic – with its focus on separate national pavilions despite the international nature of today’s art market. Is it an outdated model? If so, why are more countries than ever taking part this year?

It is a series of exhibitions not an art fair – yet Venice has long been a centre of trade. Just how commercial is its Biennale?

Jan Dalley puts these questions to Jackie Wullschlager and Peter Aspden, and picks some highlights ahead of the 54th Venice Biennale.

Produced by Griselda Murray Brown

 

Established in 1895, the Venice Biennale has been called anachronistic – with its focus on separate national pavilions despite the international nature of today’s art market. Is it an outdated model? If so, why are more countries than ever taking part this year?

It is a series of exhibitions not an art fair – yet Venice has long been a centre of trade. Just how commercial is its Biennale?

Jan Dalley puts these questions to Jackie Wullschlager and Peter Aspden, and picks some highlights ahead of the 54th Venice Biennale.

Produced by Griselda Murray Brown

 

I don’t like the idea of deputising for someone who was sorting out the financial crisis and might have been president of France, says Lucy Kellaway.

 

In this week’s podcast: We talk to the new executive director of the International Aids Society, Bertrand Audoin about his role and the agenda for the IAS in the coming months; we hear from the National Gallery about using science to detect fakes, study art history and help restore Old Master paintings; Duncan Jarvies from the BMJ reports on the practice of substantial equivalence, which allows manufacturers of medical devices to make tweaks to products without having to go through lengthy clinical trials.

Presented by Andrew Jack with Diana Garnham.

Produced by LJ Filotrani