Postmodernism: what’s not to like?

Postmodernism defined itself against the stifling clarity and seriousness Modernism. It put style before drab functionality. It embraced pop culture and garish colour.

But it got a bad rep. “PoMo” was called vacuous and kitsch, and in the 1980s it became associated with corporate culture and consumerism.

Now this controversial cultural movement is the subject of a major exhibition at London’s Victoria and Albert museum, “Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970–1990″.

Neville Hawcock talks to Glenn Adamson, co-curator of the show, and to FT columnists Edwin Heathcote and Peter Aspden.

Produced by Griselda Murray Brown