Monthly Archives: May 2012

Valentin Marinov, director of FX strategy at Citi, talks to FT currencies correspondent Alice Ross about currency interventions, looking at why the Swiss National Bank will keep defending the Swiss franc’s peg with the euro in the face of increasing money flow into the haven currency, the prospects for intervention in the yen, and the outlook for the euro.

 

Banks forced to be more upfront about how savers and protected, why workplace default pension funds could leave you with less in retirement. And why expats coming back to the UK could find it hard to get a mortgage

 

Trapped in a vicious cycle of fragile banks, economic contraction, and a yawning budget deficit, Spain’s government is now under criticism fror its handling of the crisis at Bankia, the country’s third-largest lender. So is Spain the new front line in the eurozone sovereign debt crisis? FT correspondents Miles Johnson in Madrid and Peter Spiegel in Brussels join Ben Hall to discuss.

 

The wider implications of the bailout of Spain’s second biggest bank, is it the end of the road for free banking in the UK, and are investment banks really cost cutting?

Presented by Patrick Jenkins, with Sharlene Goff, Daniel Schäfer and Brooke Masters

 

FT currencies correspondent Alice Ross talks to Steven Saywell, head of FX currency strategy in Europe at BNP Paribas about why he thinks a Greek exit is unlikely and remains bullish on the euro, as well as a look ahead to the US non-farm payroll data and the prospects for more quantitative easing in the US and UK.

 

The late choreographer and high priestess of Tanztheater Pina Bausch once said she was not interested in how people move but in what moves them.

As part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad, the Barbican Centre and Sadler’s Wells will stage Bausch’s 10 Cities.

Peter Aspden talks to Alistair Spalding, artistic director of Sadler’s Wells and a friend of Bausch, and to FT dance critic Clement Crisp, who “owns to a mistrust of Tanztheater, or dance-theatre, or Euro-tedium – call it what you will.”

Produced by Griselda Murray Brown

 

Egyptians are voting in the first democratic presidential election in their nation’s history this week, but with the powers of the office that the winner will hold still unclear and the economy in tatters, many questions remain. Heba Saleh and Borzou Daragahi, FT correspondents in Egypt, and Roula Khalaf, Middle East editor, join Shawn Donnan to discuss.

 

Lucy Kellaway on why smart people will always make stupid errors

 

The story of Bain and the buffalo makes one question business travel says Lucy Kellaway

 

Will your pension be reduced and what can you do about it? How safe are your savings – if they’re only protected by the European safety scheme? And will your mortgage rise – even if the UK interest rates are cut?