Monthly Archives: June 2012

John Normand, global head of FX strategy at JPMorgan, talks to FT currencies correspondent Alice Ross about the prospects for the euro following the EU summit and the outlook for emerging market currencies

 

Why the RBS computer glitch calls new payment technology into question; how personal pensions can pay just 0.2 per cent on cash, and why some lenders are trying to make the mortgage process easier.

 

With the European football championship reaching its climax this week, we look at how Poland and Ukraine have fared by hosting the tournament. Neil Buckley, east Europe editor, Jan Cienski, Warsaw correspondent and Simon Kuper, the FT columnist covering the tournament, join Gideon Rachman.

 

We can study Bill Gates all we like but we’re not going to end up where he is, says the FT’s Lucy Kellaway

 

This week the banking team discuss The Children’s Investment Fund’s request for a £10bn Lloyds ‘coco’ conversion, Moody’s downgrade of 15 global banks, the state of the Spanish banking system and the continuing rise of bankers’ pay

Patrick Jenkins is joined by Sharlene Goff, Daniel Schaefer and Jamie Chisholm in the studio and Victor Mallet down the line from Madrid

 

This week the FT’s currency correspondent Alice Ross is joined by Humayun Shahryar, chief executive of hedge fund Auvest Capital Management, to discuss the Fed’s decision not to introduce a third round of quantitative easing, the difficulty of trading the euro amid the ongoing eurozone debt crisis, and opportunities for investing in emerging market currencies

 

This week the FT’s currency correspondent Alice Ross is joined by Humayun Sharyar, chief executive of hedge fund Auvest Capital Management, to discuss the Fed’s decision not to introduce a third round of quantitative easing, the difficulty of trading the euro amid the ongoing eurozone debt crisis, and opportunities for investing in emerging market currencies

 

The Olivier award-winning playwright Simon Stephens is often drawn to dark subjects. “Pornography” tackled the 2005 London bombings; “Punk Rock” depicted violence at an English private school; and his controversial recent play “Three Kingdoms” shed light on the European sex trade.

Now, Stephens’ adaptations of two classics – one old, one new – are about to open in London: a rewriting of Ibsen’s A Doll’s House and a dramatisation of Mark Haddon’s novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. He talks to Jan Dalley and Sarah Hemming.

Produced by Griselda Murray Brown

 

With the announcement of the winner of Egypt’s presidential election delayed, and the ruling military’s move to dissolve the democratically-elected parliament, David Gardner, international affairs editor, and Borzou Daragahi in Cairo join Gideon Rachman to discuss whether the gains of the Egyptian revolution area being rolled back.

 

We reveal a big increase in pension fraud as well as a new index linked bond launch from Severn Trent. And why borrowers need their mortgage lender’s consent to let out their properties.