Monthly Archives: July 2012

With 2012 on track to be one of the worst years for dealmaking in a decade, are companies now focusing on 2013, or are there still deals to be done?

Anousha Sakoui, the FT’s mergers and acquisitions correspondent, takes the pulse of the industry with Jacques Brand, head of investment banking coverage & advisory at Deutsche Bank and Gilberto Pozzi, global head of retail and consumer advisory business at Goldman Sachs.

 

This week Patrick Jenkins is joined by Sharlene Goff and James Shotter in Frankfurt to discuss UBS’ profits falling short of expectations, HSBC setting aside $2bn to cover fines and what next for Nomura after its top management were purged

 

Derek Halpenny, European head of global currency research at Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi, talks to Alice Ross, FT currencies correspondent about why intervention from the Bank of Japan into the yen is unlikely despite the currency’s strength and why whilst the ECB’s bond buying programme is likely to restart, QE3 from the Fed is unlikely in August.

 

Can art fulfill the purpose of religion in a pluralist, secular society? Can we reconcile religious dogma with individual artistic creativity?

FT arts editor Jan Dalley discusses the long and sometimes fraught relationship between religion and art with Alom Shaha, physics teacher, film-maker and author of “The Young Atheist’s Handbook”, history painter Tom de Freston, and art critic Richard Cork.

Produced by Griselda Murray Brown

 

This week the FT’s world news editor Shawn Donnan is joined by James Blitz, diplomatic editor and Abigail Fielding-Smith in Beirut to discuss the conflict in Syria. Violence in the capital Damascus and commercial centre Aleppo, the disclosure that the regime possesses chemical weapons, refugee flight and the risk of instability spreading into Lebanon – is there now a case for western intervention?

 

New cuts to mortgage rates – how low can they get? Investing for the long term – why investment trusts should be in your portfolio. And the Olympics – can you make money as an investor

 

To stage this festival of sporting competitiveness every other sort of competition is being stifled says the FT’s Lucy Kellaway

 

This week the team discuss the ongoing libor scandal and its implications for the next governor of the Bank of England, capital raising at Credit Suisse and banking competition in the UK – can smaller banks such as the Co-operative, Metro and M&S draw custom away from their bigger counterparts?

Presented by Sharlene Goff, with Brooke Masters, Jennifer Thompson and Vinjeru Mkandawire

 

Matt Cobon, fixed income manager and FX specialist at Threadneedle Asset Management talks to Alice Ross, FT currency correspondent, about why low volatility in the market means traders are taking risk off the table, why the Australian dollar looks overpriced in relation to its economic fundamentals and why all eyes are on the Swiss National Bank.

 

More expensive does not necessarily mean better, says Lucy Kellaway.