Monthly Archives: November 2013

In this week’s podcast: Could geo-spatial information be the next dimension for big data? Knowing where something, or someone, is is growing in value to retailers, engineers, governments, and the military.

We speak to GIS specialists Dan Monk, technical architect at Atkins, the consulting engineers, Andrew Corcoran, of the energy and environmental consulting company West Coast Group, WO2 Giles, of the UK’s Ministry of Defence, and Euan Cameron, CTO for the applications at GIS vendor Esri, on the increasing importance of location information.

Presented and produced by Stephen Pritchard

 

Ukraine finds itself caught between Russia and the EU ahead of a summit next week in Vilnius, where the country’s president Viktor Yanukovich will have the opportunity to sign a major free trade deal and political association agreement with the EU. Russia has intensified pressure on the country recently not to sign the deal in favour of joining a Russian-led Eurasian Economic Union. In this week’s podcast, Gideon Rachman is joined by Neil Buckley, Eastern Europe editor and Peter Spiegel, Brussels bureau chief to explain how the situation is likely to develop

 

Patrick Jenkins is joined by Sam Fleming to discuss comments from Andrea Enria, chair of the European Banking Authority, on the region’s banking sector. Sharlene Goff has the remarkable story of the former Co-op bank chair caught allegedly buying drugs just days after appearing before the Treasury select committee and Daniel Schäfer has news of Edmond de Rothschild’s move to set up a merchant banking business in London

 

Patrick Jenkins is joined by Sam Fleming to discuss comments from Andrea Enria, chair of the European Banking Authority, on the region’s banking sector. Sharlene Goff has the remarkable story of the former Co-op bank chair caught allegedly buying drugs just days after appearing before the Treasury select committee and Daniel Schäfer has news of Edmond de Rothschild’s move to set up a merchant banking business in London

 

If people used the stairs, we would be deprived of the office equivalent of behind the bike shed, says Lucy Kellaway

 

They seem always to be on, but ‘Rules of Engagement’, ‘The Big Bang Theory’ and their ilk shouldn’t be taken for granted: these immaculately crafted, relentlessly inoffensive series open a window on American society

 

As Janet Yellen gives evidence to the Senate Banking Committee, Delphine Strauss is joined by Jane Foley, foreign currency strategist at Rabobank, to ask what investors are watching for from the nominee to chair the Fed. Also, is the good news on economic recovery already priced into the pound, and can Sweden’s central bank act against deflation?

 

Pensioners are being pushed into the wrong annuities. New companies are flooding onto the stock market but should ordinary investors buy their shares? And calls grow for reform of stamp duty on property.

 

Xi Jinping was appointed Chinese president just over a year ago and promised to shake up China’s economy. Now Mr Xi’s agenda for the next decade has become a little clearer with the conclusion of a party plenum in Beijing on Tuesday. In a statement the ruling Communist party pledged to implement wide-ranging economic reforms, with a greater role for market forces. In this week’s podcast Gideon Rachman is joined by Tom Mitchell, Beijing correspondent and James Kynge, editor of China Confidential to discuss whether this is a pivotal moment for the world’s second largest economy.

 

Disarm others, make them forget you are scarily powerful and lull them into liking you, says Lucy Kellaway