Monthly Archives: February 2014

A militarist matchbox, a spoof banknote, a Lennon album. . . the FT’s arts writer presents a very personal history of the past half-century in 10 objects

 

When mortgage rates rise, how bad will it be? Jonathan Eley and guests also discuss whether the UK biotech sector is set for a boom, and whether with-profits policies are worth retaining

 

Viktor Yanukovich has fled the scene of last week’s brutal crackdown on protests, but Ukraine still faces real danger from separatist tensions that could spiral into violence and the threat of financial meltdown. Ben Hall is joined over the phone by Neil Buckley, Eastern Europe editor, in Kiev, and Kathrin Hille, Moscow bureau chief, to discuss Russia’s sabre-rattling, pro-Russian sentiment in Crimea and whether western capitals can come up with a financial lifeline for Ukraine

 

The banking team discusses the varying fortunes of HSBC and RBS, the latest spat between the EU and Greece over the treatment of the Greek banking system, and Deutsche Bank reveals some details about how it will cope with the new obligation for foreign banks operating in the United States to have a US holding companies. Patrick Jenkins is joined by Martin Arnold,banking editor; Sam Fleming, financial policy correspondent; Daniel Schäfer, investment banking correspondent, and Peter Spiegel, Brussels bureau chief.

 

So long as everyone knows they are being monitored and why, it is not such a bad idea

 

If you don’t chat, people don’t like you much. So if women keep quiet at work, it matters

 

Matthew McConaughey’s career revival provides a neat case study of how an actor can wrest back control of his image. It also tells a broader story about our weakness for a certain kind of Acting.

 

In Italy, the government of Enrico Letta has fallen and the country is set to have its youngest Prime Minister ever. Matteo Renzi promises to be a radical reformer. In this week’s podcast Guy Dinmore, Rachel Sanderson and Ferdinando Giugliano join Gideon Rachman to discuss whether Mr Renzi can break the political and economic deadlock that seems to be paralysing the country and what the stakes are for Europe

 

Is it really time to swap your pounds for bitcoins? Also in the show, what falling inflation means for investors and some good news for men who have recently retired.

 

Martin Arnold, banking editor, is joined by Sharlene Goff to dissect diverging fortunes of Barclays and its staff, where pay has far oustripped performance. Daniel Schäfer has new insight into the methods used by traders at banks embroiled in the Forex scandal, and Sam Fleming explains why Lloyds is hot under the collar over proposed ringfencing measures