Monthly Archives: March 2014

Patrick Jenkins is joined by Martin Arnold for the fallout from US stress tests, where CitiGroup failed qualitative elements of the tests, putting CEO Michael Corbat under increased pressure. Six foreign-owned US banks also failed some elements, including Santander, HSBC and RBS. Sam Fleming has news of the Financial Conduct Authority, which has come in for criticism after comments about life insurers saw shares for some firms fall 20 per cent before a hasty clarification settled the markets. Simon Gleeson, a partner at Clifford Chance, joins on the line to add his thoughts on an increasingly hands-on FCA. Finally, Sam and Martin weigh in on personnel movements at UK state-owned banks, with Lloyds chairman Sir Win Bischoff stepping down and Ewen Stevenson taking over as finance chief at RBS

 

Patrick Jenkins is joined by Martin Arnold for the fallout from US stress tests, where CitiGroup failed qualitative elements of the tests, putting CEO Michael Corbat under increased pressure. Six foreign-owned US banks also failed some elements, including Santander, HSBC and RBS. Sam Fleming has news of the Financial Conduct Authority, which has come in for criticism after comments about life insurers saw shares for some firms fall 20 per cent before a hasty clarification settled the markets. Simon Gleeson, a partner at Clifford Chance, joins on the line to add his thoughts on an increasingly hands-on FCA. Finally, Sam and Martin weigh in on personnel movements at UK state-owned banks, with Lloyds chairman Sir Win Bischoff stepping down and Ewen Stevenson taking over as finance chief at RBS

 

The disease of overwork is partly in our minds and it has a bearing on how stressed we feel

 

Driven by ubiquitous video technology, a new wave of films – such as the award-winning ‘Gaza: Chronicles of a Conflict’ – favours rawness and immediacy over explanation and context

 

Jonathan Eley discusses the changes to pensions announced in the Budget with Tom McPhail, head of pensions research at Hargreaves Lansdown, and James Lloyd, a director at the Strategic Society Centre

 

Gideon Rachman is joined by Daniel Dombey, Turkey correspondent, and Leyla Boulton, head of special reports and former Turkey correspondent, to discuss Prime Minister Erdogan’s ban on Twitter and what the year ahead holds for the country and its divisive leader. The Twitter ban adds to a growing cloud of controversy, with allegations of corruption and a blackmail ring also engulfing Turkey’s political system, but Erdogan has retained much of his support from coservative groups and is still polling broadly above 40 per cent as this weekend’s local elections approach

 

Luke Johnson is wrong. Flattery is crucial to survival in the corporate world and beyond

 

Patrick Jenkins is joined by Anne-Sylvaine Chassany, private equity correspondent, for a look at how debt investors are abandoning normal creditor protections and snapping up riskier “cov-lite” loans at a faster rate and in greater proportions than at the peak of the credit bubble. Martin Arnold reports back from his interview with Jean-Laurent Bonnafé, chief executive of BNP Paribas, who sees investment banking going through a deep transition period as a result of regulation, capital requirements and a shit to electronic exchanges. Daniel Schäfer has the latest on rumblings in Russia, where Austrian banks find themselves particularly exposed, and Sharlene Goff has news of the Co-op Bank, which needs to raise another £400m just three months after its rescue

 

This week’s Budget was nothing short of revolutionary. Jonathan Eley and guests discuss the implications of the Chancellor’s reforms for ISA savers, pension holders, and investors in tax avoidance schemes

 

What are the political and personal finance consequences of the George Osborne’s UK Budget announcement? Jonathan Eley, FT personal finance editor, and Robert Shrimsley, editor of FT.com, join Matthew Vincent for the reaction to the Budget.