Monthly Archives: April 2014

Jo Cumbo explains why the government’s pensions guidance guarantee is not quite what it seems. Also in the show, David Oakley talks about the prospects of Neil Woodford’s new fund, and Jason Hollands of Bestinvest explains the performance of frontier markets

 

Long term unemployment can take a huge toll on individuals, but it also carries grave consequences for the overall economy. James Politi, US political correspondent, looks at why levels of long term joblessness remain high in the US, and whether government efforts to tackle the problem are proving effective.

 

This week, German Chancellor Angela Merkel is in Washington for talks with President Barack Obama, and Ukraine will top the agenda. Washington has led the way on sanctions, imposing asset freezes and travel bans on dozens of senior Russians and scores of companies, in an attempt to show Russia’s President Vladimir Putin that his interference in Ukraine will bring rising economic costs. The EU on the other hand, seems deeply resistant to tougher economic sanctions, given the much more important ties between Europe and Russia. In this week’s podcast, Ben Hall, world news editor, is joined by Geoff Dyer, Washington correspondent, and Stefan Wagstyl, Berlin bureau chief, to discuss how the two leaders should handle the escalating situation

 

This week, Patrick Jenkins and the banking team discuss the vexed issue of pay at RBS and Barclays, as RBS has its bonuses blocked at twice the level of salary by George Osborne, and Barclays gets criticised by angry shareholders at a recent AGM. Daniel Schäfer, investment banking correspondent, discusses Deutsche Bank’s long-rumoured capital shortfall and predicts how the bank might react in future. Finally, Sharlene Goff, retail banking correspondent looks forward to the release of the first report into what happened at the Co-operative Bank in the years leading up to the exposure of a huge £1.5bn capital hole in the bank’s balance sheet.

 

This week, Patrick Jenkins and the banking team discuss the vexed issue of pay at RBS and Barclays, as RBS has its bonuses blocked at twice the level of salary by George Osborne, and Barclays gets criticised by angry shareholders at a recent AGM. Daniel Schäfer, investment banking correspondent, discusses Deutsche Bank’s long-rumoured capital shortfall and predicts how the bank might react in future. Finally, Sharlene Goff, retail banking correspondent looks forward to the release of the first report into what happened at the Co-operative Bank in the years leading up to the exposure of a huge £1.5bn capital hole in the bank’s balance sheet.

 

Lucy Kellaway says technology is steadily ruining all the old favourites

 

A brush with institutional hauteur in Nice makes the FT’s arts writer long for the determinedly inclusive museums and galleries of the UK

 

This week, we look at Japan, where President Barack Obama is concluding a state visit. The US leader and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe have vital business to discuss, from Japan’s delicate and rather dangerous relationship with China, to the state of the Japanese economy and hopes for a major new trade deal. David Pilling, Asia editor, and Lindsay Whipp, former Tokyo correspondent, join Gideon Rachman to discuss

 

Jonathan Eley and guests discuss next week’s launch of mobile payment service Paym, why getting a mortgage may become more expensive and time-consuming, and the attractions and risks of structured products

 

Are shareholder activists fearless advocates for investors or opportunists chasing a quick buck? Stephen Foley, the FT’s US investment correspondent, reports from New York.