Monthly Archives: February 2016

Tristram and Rebecca Mayhew started their tree-top adventure business after deciding they wanted to get out of the city. They told Jonathan Moules about the risks they took, what they would do differently next time, and how it all worked out, with a little bit of luck and a lot of optimism.

 

Philip Stephens of the Financial Times, plus Ayesha Hazarika and Andrew Gimson, discuss whether the Eurosceptics or Europhiles are right about British sovereignty and why Labour has been mostly absent from the EU referendum debate. Presented by Sebastian Payne.

 

Blind Willie Johnson’s gospelly, moaning adaptation of an 18th-century hymn might have seemed an odd choice for the disc of music attached to Voyager 1 in 1977. But artists from Ry Cooder to Jack White have been drawn to its ethereal power. Credit: Legacy/Columbia, Warner Bros., Alligator Records

 

Jaroslaw Kaczynski, who heads Poland’s Law and Justice Party, is leading a conservative counter-revolution that some see as anti-democractic. Henry Foy, the FT’s Warsaw correspondent, was granted a rare interview. He talks to Gideon Rachman and Neil Buckley about the encounter.

 

Sterling’s fall following London mayor Boris Johnson’s backing for the Leave campaign in the UK referendum is all about an aimless FX market needing direction, Peter Rosenstreich of Swissquote tells Roger Blitz.

 

Author and hedge fund manager Jeff Gramm talks to the FT’s John Authers about the biggest boardroom battles of the last century, from the proxyteers of the 1950s, to the corporate raiders of the 80s and the hedge fund activists of today. Then, in an excerpt from the FT’s Alphachatterbox podcast, writer and NYU Shanghai professor Clay Shirky outlines the rise of Chinese phone maker Xiaomi, a company considered to be the most valuable startup of all time. Go to FT.com/alphachat for show notes and links.

 

Could Europe’s great postwar project fall apart? Peter Spiegel and Richard Milne say populist parties on the continent are watching as Euroscepticism becomes mainstream in British political dialogue. Contagion is seen as a risk if the country votes to leave the EU

 

Iranians go to the polls on Friday in the first major test of public opinion since last summer’s nuclear accord. President Hassan Rouhani is seeking a mandate to press on with long-promised reforms. Najmeh Bozorgmehr, FT Tehran correspondent, talks to voters about their intentions.

 

Russian air power has changed the course of the civil war in Syria and its annexation of Crimea remains largely unchallenged. Gideon Rachman talks to Neil Buckley, FT East Europe editor, and Sam Jones, defence and security editor, about Russia’s renewed confidence on the global stage and whether this is justified.

 

Are emerging market stocks in the bargain bin for good reasons? Or is it time to buy back in?
How should emerging markets fit into a balanced portfolio?