Monthly Archives: March 2016

Federal Reserve Janet Yellen is becoming more dependent on the market than data in determining monetary policy. Steven Barrow of Standard Bank tells Roger Blitz why that’s not a good idea.

 

MetLife celebrated a victory this week when a district court in Washington ruled the Obama administration had acted unlawfully in determining the biggest US insurer by assets was “too big to fail”. The FT’s Alistair Gray tells Ben McLannahan which other companies might come forward to challenge the same designation, how the ruling could affect insurance groups like AIG, and what steps Washington could take to contest the ruling.

 

It is more than a game to the Chinese. President Xi Jinping’s plan to create a ‘great sports nation’ is spurring a tide of investment in foreign star players and stakes in overseas clubs, say Ben Bland and Charles Clover. There are worries, though, over the financial foundations of the country’s latest binge

 

Last week’s attacks in the Belgian capital have raised fresh questions about the extent of Isis operations in Europe and whether security services and law enforcement agencies are capable of containing the threat. Ben Hall discusses the attacks and their ramifications with Peter Spiegel, the FT’s Brussels bureau chief and Sam Jones. defence and security editor.

 

Predictability is boring and unglamorous in a world that reveres creativity and disruption, says Lucy Kellaway

 

Are we investing our pension cash wisely or being scammed?
Buy-to-let investors in panic rush to buy before a big tax rise

 

Members of Britain’s Bankers Association have revealed that they are against Britain leaving the European Union, which is in line with the views expressed by US bankers. Patrick Jenkins discusses the poll results and why bankers have been reticent about revealing their position with Martin Arnold and Laura Noonan.

 

Patrick Jenkins and guests discuss what banks think about a possible Brexit and Credit Suisse’s unexpected portfolio of high risk assets, and in the US, Sujeet Indap asks Alistair Gray, US financial correspondent, what the squeeze on interest rates means for bank margins.

 

UK founder Jamie Waller tells Jonathan Moules how an ethical approach helped him get ahead of rivals in the debt collection business

 

Roula Khalaf, Gideon Rachman, George Parker and Janan Ganesh of the Financial Times discuss how the Brussels terrorist attacks will affect global politics, and why the Conservative party has entered into another civil war. Presented by Sebastian Payne.