Monthly Archives: November 2016

The US currency is on a tear, but it’s not all down to Donald Trump, Silvia Ardagna from Goldman Sachs tells Katie Martin. With investors finally catching up to US economic strength, an overshoot in the buck is easy to imagine.

 

A new culture podcast from the Financial Times in which we talk about film not finance, music not markets, and style not stocks. Featuring star guests and presented by John Sunyer and Griselda Murray Brown. First episode out on Thursday December 1.

 

Discussion with George Parker, the FT political editor; Stephanie Flanders, chief market strategist for JP Morgan Asset Management, and Rupert Harrison, chief macro strategist for multi-asset at Blackrock and former chief of staff to George Osborne. Presented by Sebastian Payne.

 

François Fillon, a former prime minister, looks on course to become the surprise presidential candidate of the centre-right in next year’s French presidential elections. James Wilson asks Anne-Sylvaine Chassany, Paris correspondent, and Ben Hall, world news editor, what his appeal is and how he would fare in a contest against the far-right populist leader Marine Le Pen.

 

In his first Budget statement, Philip Hammond said he wanted to get the economy ‘match fit’ for Brexit, but admitted that worsening public finances would mean the UK needed to borrow more. Barney Thompson talks to Chris Giles, FT economics editor, and George Parker, political editor, about the chancellor’s most striking announcements.

 

Presenter Claer Barrett is joined by tax and pensions experts Raj Mody of PwC, Christine Ross of Handelsbanken Wealth Management and Nimesh Shah of Blick Rothenberg to discuss the main points of Philip Hammond’s first Budget statement

 

Driverless cars will improve our lives dramatically but, as with all technologies, there will be a dark side as millions of jobs disappear, Vivek Wadhwa, entrepreneur and academic, tells John Thornhill.

 

Driverless cars will improve our lives dramatically but, as with all technologies, there will be a dark side as millions of jobs disappear, Vivek Wadhwa, entrepreneur and academic, tells John Thornhill.

 

Brussels plans to tighten rules for overseas banks operating in the EU in a tit-for-tat step against the US that will raise costs for big foreign lenders. Does this mean the global consensus on bank rules is breaking down? Patrick Jenkins, FT financial editor, discusses the issue with colleagues Martin Arnold and Caroline Binham, and hears the view of Andrea Enria, chairman of the European Banking Authority. Music by Kevin MacLeod

 

Patrick Jenkins and guests discuss the EU proposal to tighten rules for overseas banks operating in the bloc in a tit-for-tat step against the US, change at the top of Goldman Sachs and Lloyds Bank’s big bet on credit cards.