Monthly Archives: March 2017

Fewer than four weeks before the first round of voting in France’s presidential election, former prime minister Manuel Valls has provoked outrage in the Socialist party by supporting centrist independent Emmanuel Macron rather than his own party’s candidate, Benoît Hamon. But could an establishment endorsement join Mr Macron’s investment banking past as a vulnerability against attacks from Marine Le Pen? Michael Stothard joins Harriet Agnew to discuss.

 

Social-psychologist Robert Cialdini joins Cardiff Garcia to discuss the psychology of influence and the importance of what you do before attempting to persuade someone, which is the subject of his latest book “Pre-suasion”. The two also cover the role of persuasion in politics, specifically the way it has been used by Donald Trump and Barack Obama.

 

The first quarter’s popular bets – strong dollar, weak peso, high yields – did not pan out the way investors expected. But Ugo Lancioni of Neuberger Berman tells Roger Blitz that the next few months promise decent returns in forex despite ongoing worries about political risk

 

Like most humans, I am not naturally drawn to small print, says Lucy Kellaway

 

In this week’s FT Money show, presenter Claer Barrett is joined by pensions correspondent Josephine Cumbo and guests to discuss the problems faced by higher earners hit by the pensions taper one year on, how you can set up last minute investments for your children and grandchildren, and why those with mortgages on holiday homes are facing currency charges.

 

Donald Trump ran for president on the promise of bringing back US coal mining jobs, and set out to do so on Tuesday by signing an executive order that intends to roll back many of his predecessor’s actions against climate change. Ed Crooks, the FT’s US industry and energy editor, explains why the president’s move will not bring coal jobs back to the US economy.

 

Supplies of traditionally popular species have become so depleted through overfishing that commercial fleets — especially the Chinese — are trawling further from home, deeper and wider in the oceans, says Lucy Hornby. This has led to clashes as they impinge on local hunting grounds halfway across the world, Lucy says

 

Helen Margetts, head of the Oxford Internet Institute, talks to the FT’s Madhumita Murgia about fake news, echo chambers, big data and why we need more research to be able to combat the “pathologies” of the internet.

 

Patrick Jenkins and the Financial Times banking team talk to Simon Brennan, a director at Deloitte, about the Bank of England’s stress tests. The team also discuss Santander’s introduction of ‘one-hour contracts’ and take a look at Credit Suisse as it prepares to raise capital and pay big bonuses.

 

Tensions between North Korea and the US have escalated this month over Pyongyang’s fast-developing nuclear weapons programme. How is the Trump administration going to manage the reclusive state? Gideon Rachman puts the question to the FT’s Seoul bureau chief Bryan Harris and Geoff Dyer, a former FT foreign affairs correspondent.