Monthly Archives: May 2017

David Honigmann looks at how a sleeping Keith Richards dreamt up a riff that would later develop into a number one hit for Rolling Stones and become one of the most recognisable rock anthems of all times. Credits: ABKCO Records Inc, Universal International Music B.V, Rhino Atlantic, Virgin Records Ltd.

 

Will Britain’s departure from the EU be good or bad for the economy, or will it in fact have no great impact at all? Siona Jenkins puts the question to Sarah O’Connor, employment editor, and Chris Giles, economics editor.

 

Voice bot Experimental Amy might represent serious competition if what she produced was halfway decent, but it isn’t, says Lucy Kellaway

 

With George Parker, Robert Shrimsley, Miranda Green and Matt Singh of the Financial Times and Julian Glover, writer and former No 10 adviser. Presented by Jonathan Derbyshire

 

Venezuela has become trapped in a downward spiral of economic decline, social turmoil and political unrest. Gideon Rachman discusses the worsening situation with Latin America editor John Paul Rathbone and Andes correspondent Gideon Long.

 

Britain’s most vocal pro-EU campaigner is hoping to “dent” the expected Conservative landslide victory in next month’s UK election by backing candidates who pledge to work for the softest possible Brexit. She spoke to the FT’s Robert Wright about her campaign, called Best for Britain.

 

Maria Konnikova, a writer and author of “The Confidence Game: Why We Fall For It… Every Time” talks to host Cardiff Garcia about her work and the challenge of judging the quality of social-science research. The two also discuss big data, open-plan offices, sleep and the psychological effects of pornography. Maria also describes the methods and traits of con artists, and explains why everyone is susceptible to being a victim.

 

A frenzied week in forex saw the dollar and emerging market currencies come under fire, while investors loved the euro and took the pound through $1.30. Jane Foley of Rabobank sifts through the moves and tells Roger Blitz that while Donald Trump’s woes were a catalyst, the big investor worry is about China and the US economy.

 

Iranians go to the polls on Friday in what is effectively a referendum on whether to pursue closer ties with the west, or revert to the diplomatic isolation that preceded the nuclear accord in 2015. Najmeh Bozorgmehr, FT Tehran correspondent, talks to voters ahead of the poll.

 

Soho House is taking over the world. But can members’ clubs ever be cool? We’re divided – even after visiting The Ned, London’s £200m new hangout. Plus: Irish novelist Eimear McBride on the magic of modernism and ‘knicker-sniffing reviews’.