Not all rejections are equal and those followed by successes stop mattering at once, says Lucy Kellaway.

 

London’s Tate Modern is the world’s most popular museum of modern and contemporary art, with 5m visitors a year. Only 20 years ago it was the shell of a defunct power station on the banks of the Thames. Now it is expanding with a £260m extension that opens next month. Edwin Heathcote, the FT’s architecture critic, previews the new building with one of the architects, Jacques Herzog, and Tate director Nicholas Serota.

 

Suspicion that a terrorist act may have brought down the Egyptian airliner that plunged into the Mediterranean last week delivers another blow to Egypt’s already desperate tourism industry. Arrivals have collapsed, hotels shut down and many workers have lost their jobs. The FT’s North Africa correspondent Heba Saleh reports.

 

In the second half of the extended interview, former Federal Reserve chairman Paul Volcker discusses his appointment as president of the New York Federal Reserve Bank of New York, his famous tenure as Fed chair in the 1980s, and some of his thoughts on the current financial system. Hosted by Cardiff Garcia. Visit FT.com/alphachat for a full transcript of the interview.

 

The former chairman of the Federal Reserve talks to host Cardiff Garcia about the years prior to his inflation-fighting days of the 1980s, including his economics education, early career at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and US treasury, and his role in ending the Bretton Woods system of global finance. Visit FT.com/alphachat for a full transcript of the interview.

 

With George Parker, Gideon Rachman, Henry Mance and James Blitz of the Financial Times. Presented by Sebastian Payne.

 

Donald Trump went on the attack when faced with the prospect of competition to his gaming centres from Native American casinos. Regulators found he went too far, says Gary Silverman, but his campaign rhetoric now owes much to his tactics then

 

Ben Lerner is one of the most highly praised and unconventional writers of his generation. The 37-year-old recently met John Sunyer, a commissioning editor on FT Weekend, to talk about why he’s ‘doomed to write more novels’. Here, he reads one of his favourite poems.

 

Miles Davis’ “So What” is one of the most famous compositions in jazz. Ian McCann explores its many incarnations, from Ronny Jordan’s funk hit to Smiley Culture’s musings on racial unrest. Credit: Not Now Music, Columbia/Legacy, Universal-Island Records, Universal.

 

What does it mean for a private equity firm to value its investments accurately? FT Alphaville’s Matt Klein joins host Cardiff Garcia to address this surprisingly tricky question. Then, anthropologist Tassie Hirschfeld discusses the political economy of the criminal underworld, a topic rarely examined in conventional economics. Visit FT.com/alphachat for show notes and links. Music by Minden.