Presenter Claer Barrett and asset management experts discuss the multitude of charges taken out of our investment funds, workplace pensions and SIPPs

 

Austria came within a whisker of electing a far-right candidate as its head of state this week. As EU leaders breath a collective sigh of relief, World News editor Ben Hall discusses the ramifications of the election with the FT’s Austria correspondent Ralph Atkins and Brussels bureau chief Alex Barker.

 

Volkswagen has put $300m into Israeli taxi start-up Gett on the same day Toyota announced an undisclosed investment in US ride-hailing app Uber. Matthew Vincent asks the FT’s motor industry correspondent Peter Campbell what’s behind these moves.

 

Bayer, the German aspirin to week killer conglomerate has made a $62bn all cash offer for Monsanto, the US agribusiness. If agreed, the deal would create a huge global company providing farmers with everything from seeds to crop chemicals. Matthew Vincent asks FT Berlin correspondent Guy Chazan and Chicago correspondent Lindsay Whipp, to assess what chance the megadeal has of going through.

 

Motorists in France are facing long queues for petrol after unions opposed to the government’s labour reforms tightened their blockade of the country’s oil refineries. Joshua Chaffin asks the FT’s Paris bureau chief Anne-Sylvaine Chassany why the unions are so angry.

 

Patrick Jenkins and guests discuss the rapid rise of contactless payments in the UK, management changes at UniCredit, Italy’s biggest bank, and how Moody’s, the ratings agency, views US investment banks.

 

Not all rejections are equal and those followed by successes stop mattering at once, says Lucy Kellaway.

 

London’s Tate Modern is the world’s most popular museum of modern and contemporary art, with 5m visitors a year. Only 20 years ago it was the shell of a defunct power station on the banks of the Thames. Now it is expanding with a £260m extension that opens next month. Edwin Heathcote, the FT’s architecture critic, previews the new building with one of the architects, Jacques Herzog, and Tate director Nicholas Serota.

 

Suspicion that a terrorist act may have brought down the Egyptian airliner that plunged into the Mediterranean last week delivers another blow to Egypt’s already desperate tourism industry. Arrivals have collapsed, hotels shut down and many workers have lost their jobs. The FT’s North Africa correspondent Heba Saleh reports.

 

In the second half of the extended interview, former Federal Reserve chairman Paul Volcker discusses his appointment as president of the New York Federal Reserve Bank of New York, his famous tenure as Fed chair in the 1980s, and some of his thoughts on the current financial system. Hosted by Cardiff Garcia. Visit FT.com/alphachat for a full transcript of the interview.