World Weekly with Gideon Rachman
  • Europe's budget wrangles Oct 22, 2014 - 4:30 pm
  • Gideon Rachman is joined by Peter Spiegel, Brussels bureau chief, and Tony Barber, Europe editor, to discuss the threat that the European Commission will reject the budgets of some of Europe’s biggest nations, in particular France and Italy. Is such a move really possible and what would be the political and economic consequences?
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  • Turkey's role in the war against Isis Oct 16, 2014 - 7:09 pm
  • Gideon Rachman is joined by David Gardner and Daniel Dombey to discuss Turkey's role in the unfolding war against the jihadist movement Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. Does Turkey share western war aims or is the government of President Erdogan more interested in crushing the Kurdish movements that are fighting Isis?
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  • Brazil at the crossroads Oct 09, 2014 - 6:03 pm
  • The first round of voting in Brazil's presidential elections is over and the incumbent Dilma Rousseff will face a centre right candidate Aécio Neves in the second round. Gideon Rachman discusses the differences between the candidates and what is at stake with Joe Leahy and Jonathan Wheatley
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  • Hong Kong's political crisis Oct 02, 2014 - 2:54 pm
  • The scale and persistence of the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong have taken many by surprise. Gideon Rachman is joined by David Pilling, Asia editor, and Tom Mitchell, Beijing correspondent, to discuss the crisis and China's response.
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  • Sarkozy returns to frontline politics Sep 23, 2014 - 4:58 pm
  • With President François Hollande languishing at record lows in the polls, former president Nicolas Sarkozy has announced that he plans to return to frontline politics, which almost certainly means a view to running for the presidency in 2017. Gideon Rachman is joined by Hugh Carnegy, Paris bureau chief, and Tony Barber to discuss his prospects.
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  • Isis and the new war in Iraq Sep 16, 2014 - 5:25 pm
  • Barack Obama, the US president, promised in a televised address to destroy Isis, the self-proclaimed Islamist state in Iraq. Does that mean another western war in the Middle East is under way? Gideon Rachman puts the question to Roula Khalaf, FT foreign editor, James Blitz, former security editor, and David Gardner, FT correspondent in Beirut.
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  • Scottish referendum outcome too close to call Sep 11, 2014 - 5:59 pm
  • A late surge in support for Scotland's pro-independence camp a week ahead of the referendum has set alarm bells ringing among politicians in London. James Blitz is joined by Michael Stott and Mure Dickie to discuss the arguments being used to sway Scottish voters
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  • Rising tensions over war in Ukraine Sep 03, 2014 - 5:42 pm
  • The War in Ukraine, the rising tensions between Russia and the West, Vladimir Putin's objectives, and how ordinary Russians and Russia's other neighbouring states see the conflict. Neil Buckley, the FT's eastern Europe editor and Jack Farchy, Moscow correspondent, join Gideon Rachman.
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  • Ebola: what risk does the virus pose to Africa and the wider world? Jul 30, 2014 - 5:30 pm
  • Parts of Western Africa are gripped by the Ebola virus, with more than 670 dead in the current outbreak. Gideon Rachman is joined by Clive Cookson, science editor, and Javier Blas, Africa editor, to discuss how serious a threat the virus poses to the region and to the wider world, and what the international community can do to thwart its progress
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  • Crisis over the MH17 atrocity Jul 23, 2014 - 6:00 pm
  • Russia and the west have been increasingly at odds following the shooting down of a Malaysian Airlines flight over Ukraine, an atrocity that has been widely blamed on pro-Russian separatists. What are Vladimir Putin's options, and what diplomatic accommodation be can be found to make the situation less volatile?
    Katherine Hille, Moscow bureau chief, and Neil Buckley, east Europe editor, join Gideon Rachman.
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  • Gaza crisis: what does current conflict mean for Netanyahu, Hamas and the wider middle east? Jul 16, 2014 - 4:20 pm
  • As bombing reaches its ninth consecutive day, Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu is facing criticism abroad for causing unnecessary bloodshed, and at home for not sending troops into Gaza. Gideon Rachman is joined by Siona Jenkins, Middle east news editor, and from Gaza by John Reed, Jerusalem bureau chief to look deeper at the broader Israeli/Palestinian conflict and how Hamas has been able to use the current crisis to drum up support as chaos in the middle east reaches levels unparalleled in recent decades
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  • US-German relations strained over new spying allegations Jul 09, 2014 - 4:45 pm
  • Germany has summoned the US envoy following allegations that an agent working for Germany’s intelligence agency was spying for the US. Gideon Rachman is joined by James Blitz, former security correspondent, and Jeevan Vasagar, Berlin correspondent, to discuss what this means for already troubled relations between the Obama and Merkel governments, and how the two nations can resolve their differences in order to tackle the numerous shared geopolitical challenges they face.
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  • What would an Erdogan presidency mean for Turkey? Jul 02, 2014
  • Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has announced he will run in the country's first every directly elected presidential contest next month. Ben Hall is joined by Istanbul correspondent Daniel Dombey and FT columnist David Gardner to discuss how is the turmoil across the border in Syria and Iraq is changing the political dynamics ahead of the election, and whether an Erdogan victory would mean breaking the grip of Turkey's old elite, or just another step towards authoritarian rule.
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  • Who are the winners and losers in a Juncker presidency? Jun 25, 2014 - 6:45 pm
  • With Jean-Claude Juncker increasingly likely to be appointed as the next president of the European Commission, Gideon Rachman is joined by Tony Barber, Europe editor, and Peter Spiegel, Brussels bureau chief, for an in-depth look at what this would mean for the UK and for Europe as a whole. Also on the agenda are the growing dominance of Germany in the EU decision-making process and this week's European Council meeting in Ypres
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  • Isis pushes Iraq to the brink Jun 18, 2014 - 6:30 pm
  • Isis’ lightning offensive has pushed Iraq to the brink of outright civil war and a return to the murderous sectarian bloodshed that nearly tore it apart in 2006. President Obama is considering limited military intervention to take on the terrorists but only if there are signs that Nouri al-Maliki, Iraq’s Shia prime minister does more to reach out to moderate Sunnis and Kurds. Geoff Dyer, US diplomatic correspondent, Roula Khalaf, foreign editor, and Guy Chazan, energy editor, join Ben Hall
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  • Brazil 2014: Political tensions surround World Cup Jun 11, 2014 - 5:55 pm
  • About half the world's population is expected to watch the World Cup in Brazil, but the run up to the tournament has been troubled by demonstrations in Brazil and all-too-familiar allegations of corruption at the heart of Fifa, world football's governing body. Joe Leahy, Brazil correspondent, Roger Blitz, leisure industries correspondent, and JP Rathbone, Latin American editor, join Gideon Rachman to discuss the state of the World Cup.
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  • US and China taking climate change seriously Jun 05, 2014 - 7:17 pm
  • Gideon Rachman is joined by Pilita Clark, environment correspondent, and Richard McGregor, Washington bureau chief, to discuss renewed efforts to tackle climate change. The Obama administration appears to have succeeded in making climate change a public health issue, and has set a target of reducing US power plant emissions by 30 per cent by 2030. Meanwhile rumours abound that China could include strict targets in its next five year plan, although sustaining economic growth remains its priority.
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  • The fallout from the European elections May 27, 2014
  • The recent European Parliament elections have transformed the continent’s political landscape. Anti-establishment parties have scored remarkable victories in countries such as France, Greece and the UK while mainstream forces have done less well. But good results for Angela Merkel’s CDU in Germany and Matteo Renzi’s Democratic Party in Italy show voters have not completely turned their backs on the EU. In this week’s podcast, Ferdinando Giugliano is joined by Tony Barber, Europe editor, Hugh Carnegy, Paris bureau chief, and Guy Dinmore, Rome correspondent, to discuss the fallout from the elections
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  • Relations between Russia and China May 22, 2014
  • President Vladimir Putin's recent visit to Beijing took on added significance because of the deep divisions between Russia and the west, caused by the Ukrainian crisis. The two countries signed a landmark deal on gas supplies, as well as other agreements covering trade and arms sales. So is a new Russia-China axis emerging? Gideon Rachman is joined by James Blitz and James Kynge to discuss.
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  • EU elections - the populists are coming May 15, 2014 - 5:40 pm
  • This week's podcast explores the rise of Europe's populist parties, and internal ructions over the election process for José Manuel Barroso's successor as EU President. Peter Spiegel, Brussels bureau chief, and Tony Barber, Europe editor, join Gideon Rachman to ask whether strong polling for populist parties should be seen more as a threat to their domestic rivals or to the result of next week's European elections. Also on the agenda is the fear that the disagreement between the European Parliament and heads of state over the process by which the next EU President will be chosen, is exactly the kind of internal standoff that gives eurosceptics justification for disengaging with EU politics
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  • How should Nigeria tackle the militant threat of Boko Haram? May 09, 2014
  • Nigeria’s status as the new economic powerhouse of Africa was supposed to be the talking point of a meeting of African leaders and top executives in Abuja this week. Instead, the world is in uproar over the government’s slow response to the abduction of more than 200 schoolgirls by the Boko Haram terrorist group last month.

    In this week’s podcast, Ben Hall, world news editor, is joined by William Wallace, the FT’s Africa affairs writer and Javier Blas, Africa editor, to discuss western governments’ increasing concern at the upsurge in attacks and the Nigerian state’s apparent inability to deal with the militant threat.
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ABOUT THIS PODCAST

Each week World Weekly focuses on some of the major international political stories that are making the headlines - drawing upon the FT's team of foreign correspondents and international analysts to make sense of world events

Presented by Gideon Rachman

To take part in the show or to comment please email audio@ft.com