Everything Else

From Baywatch to Justin Bieber, we discuss the best (and worst) of this summer’s trashy film and music. Plus: the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Elizabeth Strout on writing about class in the age of Trump.

 

Finally, gay art and writing is getting the attention it deserves. We celebrate with novelist Philip Hensher and critic Jackie Wullschlager. Plus: Twitter’s favourite poet Patricia Lockwood remembers growing up in the American Midwest with her gun-toting Catholic ‘priestdaddy’.

 

From Orwell to The Hunger Games, dystopian fiction is back in fashion. But can it offer comfort in troubled times? We discuss the best books, films and the new TV adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’. Plus: sculptor Conrad Shawcross on the sinister beauty of machines.

 

It’s the story that dominated the world’s premier film festival: we discuss how Netflix is reshaping the future of cinema. Plus: the writer Reni Eddo-Lodge on her new book ‘Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race’.

 

‘Happiness data’ says youth is carefree, retirement is bliss, and you muddle through in between. We argue with the FT’s Lucy Kellaway about which stage of life is the best. Then: novelist Will Self hotboxes the studio and holds forth on our obsession with smartphones and the future of London.

 

Soho House is taking over the world. But can members’ clubs ever be cool? We’re divided – even after visiting The Ned, London’s £200m new hangout. Plus: Irish novelist Eimear McBride on the magic of modernism and ‘knicker-sniffing reviews’.

 

Hello again! We’re back — with a Hollywood A-lister and an architectural conundrum. Jude Law visits the FT to discuss masculinity, “method” and music (he’s learning how to play the piano). But first we ask: who will build Donald Trump’s wall? What will it look like? And when did architecture turn nasty?

 

The FT’s culture podcast Everything Else is coming back soon — featuring interviews with Jude Law, Eimear McBride, Will Self and lots more

 

In our season finale, we discuss hoax stories and Facebook “filter bubbles”; Nigerian novelist Ayobami Adebayo explores love and childlessness; and the FT’s editor Lionel Barber has lunch with Jean-Claude Juncker.

 

The bestselling Neapolitan Quartet is now a two-part play in London. But are adaptations always second best? Plus, 24-year-old writer Edouard Louis on growing up poor and gay in rural France – and why his family will vote Marine Le Pen next month.