The unexplained death of Kim Jong Nam, a member of North Korea’s ruling family, in Kuala Lumpur has caused a diplomatic rupture between Malaysia and North Korea. James Kynge asks Bryan Harris, FT correspondent in Seoul, what we know about the apparent murder and its likely repercussions.

 

Men in crisis? What crisis? Plus, the food world’s social media star and author of the fastest selling debut cookbook ever on why vegetables are cool – and why she hates to be called the ‘queen of clean-eating’

 

FT Money Show presenter James Pickford and guests discuss digital innovation, final salary pensions schemes and fund fees.

 

Bill Gates has a new idea. He wants us to tax robots. The Microsoft co-founder made his unexpected suggestion in an interview with Quartz magazine. Sarah O’Connor asks the FT’s West Coast editor Richard Waters what he meant by this and the likely reaction of the tech industry. Photo credit: Getty

 

Warren Buffett and 3G were taken aback by the harsh rejection of the takeover offer they had backed but people close to the Anglo-Dutch group say the deal made no financial or strategic sense for them. Arash Massoudi and James Fontanella-Khan tell a tale of miscalculation and culture divide

 

Telling others what you did before can be a sign of mediocrity, says Lucy Kellaway. Illustration by Chris Tosic

 

Madhumita Murgia speaks to Kathryn Parsons about her work in promoting digital literacy through the company she co-founded, Decoded, which aims to teach people to code in a day.

 

Deutsche Bank has welcomed a big new shareholder – HNA from China. Patrick Jenkins discusses what we know about the Chinese investors and why they might have bought into the European bank, with Martin Arnold, FT banking editor, and Don Weinland, correspondent in Hong Kong. Music by Kevin MacLeod

 

Patrick Jenkins and guests discuss a proposal that Royal Bank of Scotland should no longer be required to sell Williams & Glyn, Deutsche Bank’s mystery Chinese investor and HSBC’s disappointing results. With special guest Andrew Coombs of Citigroup.

 

Ecuador’s presidential poll is another big test for Latin America’s battered left. At stake is the legacy of Rafael Correa, a populist leader who has been in power for a decade. His protégé Lenín Boltaire Moreno has almost enough votes to avoid a run-off. But the full picture will not emerge for several days. Jonathan Wheatley discusses what happens next with Andres Schipani, the FT’s Andes correspondent.