FT News

India’s chief justice this week made a tearful plea to the government for more judges to help tackle the country’s vast backlog of more than 33m outstanding cases. India’s justice system is notoriously slow, with actions and appeals sometimes lasting decades. Ben Hall asks Victor Mallet, the FT’s South Asia bureau chief, what is being done to tackle the problem.

 

Shareholder activism is on the rise, often motivated by outrage over the stratospheric pay rises that chief executives award themselves. Sharlene Goff asks David Oakley, FT Corporate Affairs correspondent, what have been the biggest recent rebellions and whether they can make a difference.

 

Why would a big US telecoms company be looking to buy a struggling internet brand? The FT’s Shannon Bond and David Crow discuss Verizon’s alleged interest in merging Yahoo with its AOL business.

 

Goldman Sachs, the go-to bank of the rich and powerful, is moving into consumer lending and consumer savings. Patrick Jenkins, FT financial editor, discusses the surprise development with US banking editor Ben McLannahan, UK banking editor Martin Arnold, and Sam Theodore of credit rating agency Scope Ratings. Music by Kevin MacLeod

 

The effort to develop an Ebola vaccine has made progress recently, but too late to save those who died during last year’s epidemic. Scientists are now racing to find a vaccine against the zika virus. Andrew Ward, FT pharmaceuticals correspondent, asks Charlie Weller of the Wellcome Trust why scientists are so often behind the curve. Music by David Sappa

Read more on vaccines in an FT Special Report at ft.com/vaccines

 

The EU has widened its landmark antitrust battle against Google, accusing the US technology group of abusing its dominance of the smartphone operating system Android. Ravi Mattu examines the case against Google with Murad Ahmed, the FT’s European technology correspondent.
Music by David Sappa

 

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton secured substantial victories in the New York primaries on Tuesday night, strengthening Clinton’s position as Democratic frontrunner but doing little to ease speculation of a contested nomination process at the Republican party convention in July. The FT’s Washington bureau chief Demetri Sevastopulo talks to Neil Munshi about the results and the state of the nomination race. Visit FT.com/nbe to sign up for the White House Countdown email newsletter.

 

The 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death is being marked by celebrations around the world, including in London, where he wrote his plays. Sarah Hemming, the FT’s theatre critic, speaks to Dominic Dromgoole, outgoing artistic director of Shakespeare’s Globe, about why the playwright’s work has proved so influential around the world.

 

Brazil is in a deepening economic and political crisis. Will the impeachment proceedings against President Dilma Rousseff help resolve the country’s problems? Jonathan Wheatley asks Joe Leahy, the FT’s Brazil bureau chief, what happens next.

 

Prof Iris Bohnet explains to Sarah Gordon, the FT’s business editor, her research into “unconscious gender bias” in candidate selection and performance appraisals in business, and explains the famous experiment at the Boston Symphony Orchestra which now has 40 per cent female musicians after auditions were conducted behind screens.